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downturn. the problem is the program has not worked well. it is not tied to the condition of the economy. it needs to be fixed. roseanne. -- >> roseanne. >> i am inspired. i want folks to understand they have to engage. they cannot trust those in washington d.c.. we have got to take control in our democracy. i want to talk about the fact this goes back to unemployment. it is a very easy read. it cuts to the chase in terms of facts that there are programs to get through and get 100% employment. do not discount america. take control of america. [applause] >> i forgot to mention, the book is called america's poor and the great recession. ideas about what democrats and republicans can agree on. speaker gingrich. >> thank you for assembling an amazing group and a fascinating evening. i hope everybody found it as intriguing as i did. it is clear our institutions and poverty -- institutions are not working. there is a need to rethink from the ground up and use all of the various technologies. then have a conference at the end and then give a major speak. i think we do not have the solutions in
having different task force for the visa according to the economy? >> there has to be away -- a lot of our laws date back to the 1950's. some to the 1960's. there has to be a way of bringing it up to date. those are things that will have to be negotiated. all be just say it can't managed by a central system in washington where washington decides how many nurses we need, how many farm workers. business will have to play a role and business will have to be the determining factor in order to make this work in a practical way. >> think for a man and that 10,000 people a day retire in the united states, seven days a week. we are a nation with unemployment and with a shortage of people that go to work at specific jobs. the secretary's point is on target. if you try to do this with an overseer of exactly how many left-handed nurses and right- handed carpenters get into the added states, we are doing the wrong thing. we need to do it on demand. if we have an extraordinary need to be competitive, and many, because of the price of energy and the fact the country is probably will have and have
in part, difference to the sluggish economy and the challenges that the nation faces and the crowds will be smaller. george h.w. bush and george w. bush won't be here. there have been pres debts where presidents in the past haven't made it. george h.w. bush just got out hospital, which is why they won't be here. mitt romney won't be here. the last time a vanquished opponent didn't show up was in 1985 for ronald reagan, and walter mondale was a no-show. that was the last time that the 20th state fell on a sunday and they had to do the monday as i rememberrial, versus another day. and back in those days, it was the coldest one on record, 7 degrees. there will be differences between the obama 2009 and 2013. four years ago, the crowd estimate was nearly 2 million people. there is a big parlor game about whether the crowd estimates on the mall are ever accurate. but nearly 2 million. now they are saying between 600- to 800,000. and there are a series of other things. and the money. four years ago, the obama administration, the obama campaign raised $53 million for the inaugural with pers
much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around... >> narrator: the cascade of bad news began with the economy. >> fear swept through the markets... >> he had to start thinking about this the day after he was elected. >> this was the most eventful and consequential presidential transition in american history. >> we were all worried about what we were seeing. we knew that the credit system was pretty quickly headed towards something that looked a lot like seizure. >> narrator: the president-elect was told that in the two months since lehman brothers crashed, the panic on wall street had only gotten worse. >> what we were facing was something that, really, he had never contemplated, never experienced. >> narrator: unemploymenwas nearly seven percent and climbing. the stock market was down more than 6,000 points. >> there was a growing sense of calamity. this could be the most climactic economic crisis in all of american history, that we were that close to a complete melt
economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. homes have been lost, jobs shed, businesses shuttered. our healthcare is too costly costly and our schools fail too many. each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet. these are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. less measurable, but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land. a nagging fear that america owes the decline is inevitable, but the next generation must lower its sights. today i say to you that the challenges we face are real. they are serious and they are many. they will not be met easily or in a short span of time, that know this, america -- they will be met. [cheers and applause] on this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of her pace over conflict and discord. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and
economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being responsible on debt issues when this president has been in the white house since january the 20th, 2009, and he has yet to do anything significant on social security or medicare. he cut medicare, so he could start a new entitlement program. that's not making medicare more solvent. he hasn't done anything to curb the costs of medical expenses, which he said he was going to do. he did nothing. he struck back room
decisions but to secure equal pay for equal work, it to protect medicare for seniors and to build an economy that works for the middle class. that is exactly what we should expect from washington. [applause] i am proud to say that we have a president we can count on. president obama has been taking a strong stand with the women and families on health care, equality, economic security. he appointed two fantastic women to the united states supreme court. [applause] and he chose his biggest rival to be his partner on the world stage. we are so proud of hillary clinton. [applause] president obama trusts women and women can trust president obama. we have a reason to feel good about where we stand today. with the movement we have built together, we have reason to aim high elie the years to come. -- aim high in the years to come. last cycle, we more than quintupled the size of the economy -- our community. we're using technology to open our doors to another generation of women, and men, where we meet them. we reach them where they are. we help them understand what is at stake. we added in their voi
promises. or helping the economy. how did you weigh those? when he makes a promise on the plus side, does he get a plus on at 500 or does he get a negative? the net -- the next time, does he get guest: we have a category called obama's top promises. you can look at those and you can see that i think his record of fulfilling them is not quite as high as overall. you make a good point -- some of his promises were sweeping and thematic and others were very specific. there were two that were lighthearted -- we included two promises like that. one was his promise during the campaign that he would buy his daughter as a puppy which is a promise kept in the other was that he would fight for a college football playoff system which we also raided a promise kept indeed, you could say this is the aggregate and you need to look in on the more narrow numbers. we published an article yesterday but we welcome anybody who wants to tally them up in different ways and provide an analysis. all promises are not created equal. host: we are looking at the top promises on politifact - tell us more about compromi
. this is likely to be more subdued out of deference to the economy and national challenges faced by the u.s.a. and the new president there are metrics to show. four years ago there was about 2 million people that showed up. this time around, experts are predicting somewhere between 600,000 to 800,000 so it could be a third of the crowd four years ago. in addition these are not expensive activities trick when you consider he has taken the oath of office and in his second term but they will do in ceremony. last time around it cost $53 million and obama administration raised that money. a lot of money but that was pretty significant amount of cash. this time around, in order to raise something close to it. they changed the rules. no more limitation to private donors, they are using corporate money something that barack obama disdained but that is something he would like to steer clear of. $50,000 cap made it kept to small donors, they have blown that off, too. they are not likely to match the number four years ago, $40-50 million, another time the second time around enthusiasm tends to wane.
on him and to what jay carney said about the president and the economy. >> shovel ready was not as shovel ready as we expected. >> the reelection was in some ways for all of us here, you know, a humbling experience because it was an assertion by the electorate to said despite how hard the last four years have been on this country because of the great economic crisis that we were in when the president took office, that the steps that we've taken have been the right steps, and more work needs to be done. >> more work needs to be done. when you talk to the president's top advisors, they say he wants to act quickly after the inaugural address and state of the union coming up in february to work on key domestic issues like immigration he reform, like gun control that he's been talking about throughout this week, but he realizes as well, they say, that he's got to keep his eye on the ball in terms of the economy, the jobs crisis, even though unemployment has gotten a little better in recent months, it's still obviously a very, very difficult situation all around the country, megyn. >> megyn: su
. >> well, it is four years later now, a battered economy and political extremism, even more so than it was at the time he gave that speech. how does he create a lasting vision of his own presidency? joining us, presidential historian richard norton smith. it does strike me this address is the beginning of the writing of history of the presidency of barack obama. everyone talks about how in the second term, presidents run for history. this is that first kind of draft, isn't it? >> some ways that's a dangerous concept. think about it, all of a sudden you're playing to the academic jury, that's the ultimate electorate, the people who will decide if you're a near great president or average president, you know, whether you're a teddy roosevelt or a chester arthur, and you probably shouldn't be playing to them more than any other particular interest group. i'm part of the jury. see, you only get to vote for president once are we get to vote over and over again. but presidents really, it seems to me, that's just one more interest group they should avoid tailoring their actions. >> we talk
in washington. for washington, this is a great injection into the economy. host: this is from one of our viewers -- guest: thought the inauguration funding has not changed very much. the best comparison for this year is 2005, the george w. bush second inauguration, $45 million was raised for his committee. security costs there were comparable. there rose fivefold after 9/11. by 2005 they were in the $100 million range. this inauguration, despite hardships, the numbers are staying fairly concept -- fairly constant. host: our first president was sworn in on april 30 in new york city. it has moved back and forth from the east front to other locations on capitol hill. from harry truman through jimmy carter, it was always on the east front of the capital. moved by the congressional committee to the west front in 1985, which is where it remains today. kansas, independent line, good morning. caller: i think it is amazing that we all want to complain about every penny that is spent in washington, d.c., because of the inauguration. this is something special that happens every four years. surely, surely,
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)